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#1: George Herman "Babe" Ruth

The name synonymous with the game of baseball is Babe Ruth!  Among the giants of the game, Ruth stands alone at the top, recognized as the single greatest player the game has ever seen. Why the near-universal acceptance of Ruth as the Greatest of All Time?  Just look at where The Babe currently stands in 10 Key Statistics:

3rd on home run list – 714
10th in batting average – .342
2nd on RBI list – 2,213
1st on all-time slugging % – .690
2nd on all-time on-base % – .474
1st on all-time OPS – 1.164
4th on all-time runs list – 2,174
6th on all-time total bases list – 5,793
3rd on all-time walks list – 2,062

Even more amazing, when Ruth came into the majors, he was a pitcher who amassed a record of P 94-46 with an ERA of 2.28! This was not good enough for Ruth though!  He wanted to be an every day player, so he requested and got a move to the outfield where he played the majority of his remaining career.

There’s just too much information on this player’s greatness, so do yourself a favor and find out more about the Game’s Greatest Player on his WEB SITE, www.baberuth.com!

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#2: "Hammerin'" Hank Aaron

Without a doubt, around the Atlanta area, Hank Aaron is regarded as the greatest Brave and ballplayer that ever lived even though he lands at #2 on Dimino’s List (Which proves he’s NO HOMER!).  Though he falls into the “bridesmaid’s spot” on the list, his baseball chops could make him a viable argument for the top position.

First of all, Aaron holds the record for All-Star Selections at 25, and holds the record with Stan Musial and Willie Mays for the number of All Star Games played at 24! But that’s just the beginning…

During his career, Aaron won 3 Gold Gloves, was the NL Batting Champ Twice, the NL Home Run Leader 4X, the NL RBI leader 4X, and his signature achievement came April 8, 1974 in Atlanta in front of a record crowd of a crowd of 53,775 when he hit his 715th home run surpassing the great Babe Ruth.

Aaron holds the MLB records for the most career runs batted in (RBI) (2,297), extra base hits (1,477), and total bases (6,856), is in the top five for career hits (3,771) and runs (2,174) and is is one of only four players to have at least seventeen seasons with 150 or more hits. Aaron is in second place in home runs (755) and at-bats (12,364), and in third place in games played (3,298).

At the time of his retirement, Aaron held most of the game’s key career power hitting records.

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The Most Famous Home Run in History!

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#3: Ted Williams

When Ted Williams was in the Pacific Coast League Minor League System, a Boston Red Sox talent scout said of Ted Williams, “He stood out like a brown cow in a field of white cows.

That particular scout KNEW greatness when he saw it!

Ted Williams appears on this survey at #3 for very good reason! During his 19 year career with the Boston Red Sox, “The Thumper” was a 19X All Star, 2x AL MVP, a 2X Triple Crown winner, 6X AL Batting Champ, 4X AL Home Run Leader, an MLB Record for On-Base Percentage of .482 (Still #1 to this day!), a lifetime batting average of .344, 2,654 Hits, 1,839 RBIs, and 521 Home Runs!  Williams topped all of this with his induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966.

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#4: Willie Mays

When it comes to physical gifts required to play the game of baseball, Willie Mays was one who was lavished with many!  Considered to be the greatest all-round baseball player who ever lived, Mays’ career stats place him among the elite of the elite in MLB history!  It started his first season with his being named Rookie of the Year in 1951, and over 24 seasons, Mays compiled 24 All-Star Awards, 2 NL MVPs, 12 Gold Gloves, one NL Batting Crown (1954), and a 4X Home Run Leader, and the stolen base leader 4X (1956–1959).

At the plate, when Mays wasn’t going yard, he was using his incredible speed to get on base and steal as many as possible.  In his career, Mays had 10,881 at bats with 3,283 Hits, 1,903 RBI, 660 Home Runs (Currently 5th all time), and a lifetime batting average of .302.  Once on base, Mays was a threat to steal and successfully did so 338 times!

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#5: Lou Gehrig

When we move into the top five baseball players of all time, there is no dispute that THESE players are the absolute best of the best among those who have played the game, and at #5 Lou Gehrig was DEFINITELY one of the best!

During his 16 Year Career with the NY Yankees, Gehrig amassed an astounding resume: He was a 7X All Star, 6X World Series Champion, The AL MVP twice, the AL Batting Champ of 1934, a Triple Crown Winner (1934), 5X Leader in RBI for the AL, is only one of 18 to hit 4 home runs in a single game, had a career batting average of .340, hit 493 Home Runs, drove in 1995 Runs, and 2,721 hits.

Sadly, all of Gehrig’s accomplishments on the diamond were eclipsed when Gehrig disclosed that he was suffering from ALS in 1939, Later to be known as “Lou Gehrig’s Disease.”  According to the NY State Department of health,

“ALS is a progressive disease that destroys nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord which control the muscles throughout the body. When these nerve cells (also called motor neurons) die, the brain can no longer send impulses (messages) to the muscle fibers that normally result in muscle movement. The disease most commonly afflicts people between the ages of 40 and 70. As many as 30,000 Americans have the disease at any given time.

The earliest symptoms of the disease depend upon which nerves and muscles are first affected. Any muscle group may be the first to show signs of the disease. For example, the person may experience twitching and weakness of the muscles of the hands or lower legs. If the muscles of the face or throat are affected, the problem at onset would be difficulty with speaking, chewing, swallowing or movements of the tongue and face. If the muscles of the chest are affected the person may have difficulty breathing. In some instances the first symptoms may be involuntary weeping or laughing. In the beginning, muscle groups on only one side of the body may be affected, but as time passes, more and more muscles on both sides are involved and the patient becomes totally paralyzed. Yet, through it all, for the vast majority of people, their minds remain unaffected.

On June 2, 1941, at 10:10 pm, Gehrig died at his home.

The Most Famous Baseball Speech In History

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#6: Mickey Mantle

Within Dimino’s Top 100 are numerous players that are known for hitting home runs, but Mickey Mantle is known for hitting some of the longest “tape measure home runs,” the longest of which is estimated to have flown 643 feet! Mantle wasn’t one dimensional at the plate either, able to switch hit for power and percentage! 

Over his career, Mantle had a lifetime batting average of .298, with 2,415 hits, 536 Home Runs, 1,509 RBI, was a 3X AL MVP, the 1956 AL Batting Champ, won a Gold GLove in 1962, was the AL Leader in Home Runs 4X, the AL Leader in RBI in 1956 and a 20X All Star.

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#7: Stan Musial

Stan “The Man” Musial is a walking baseball statistic who at one time or another led the Majors in every conceivable record EXCEPT home runs!  When you look at his body of work, there’s no doubt Musial is one of the elites of the game!  Consider these stats: Lifetime batting average of .331, 475 Home Runs, 3,630 Hits, 1,950 RBI, named an All Star 24X, 3X NL MVP, 7X NL Batting Champ, 2X NL RBI Leader and the topper – He was a first ballot Hall of Fame Inductee in 1969!

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#8 - Walter Johnson

This is the last pitcher on Dimino’s list, and in his opinion, the BEST pitcher on this list…YES BETTER THAN CY YOUNG, and some of his records stand NINE DECADES since Young retired from baseball!

Let’s start with the man’s statistics: 802 Games pitched, 417 Wins (2nd All Time), 3,509 Strikeouts, and a lifetime ERA of 2.17!  Johnson also holds the MLB record for Shutouts with 110, is second all time in complete games with 531 and was the strikeout leader 12X, eight of which were consecutive!

One other thing to mention too: Johnson was regarded by players and fans as one of the NICEST guys ever to play the game, and whenever his named was mentioned it was always used as an example of good sportsmanship and friendly competition.

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#9: Yogi Berra

Yogi Berra may be the ONE player in all of baseball history who is remembered more for what he did OFF the field than what he did on it!

Berra played 19 seasons in Major League Baseball (1946–63, 1965), all but the last for the New York Yankees. He was an 18-time All-Star and won 10 World Series championships as a player—more than any other player in MLB history!

Berra had a career batting average of .285, hit 358 home runs and drove in 1,430 runs, he is one of only five players to win the American League Most Valuable Player Award 3x, and is widely regarded as one of the greatest catchers in baseball history! In 1972, Berra was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

“Yogi-isms”
As mentioned earlier, Berra is probably more well known for his impromptu pithy comments, malapropisms, and seemingly unintentional witticisms, known as “Yogi-isms.”  More often than not, they seemed contradictory in nature, but with smatterings of truth and wittiness.  Some of his most famous quotes have gone on to become everyday American phrases like:

It’s like déjà vu all over again.

No one goes there nowadays, it’s too crowded.

Baseball is 90% mental and the other half is physical.

A nickel ain’t worth a dime anymore.

We made too many wrong mistakes.

Slump? I ain’t in no slump… I just ain’t hitting.

The future ain’t what it used to be.

And possibly his most famous quote:
It ain’t over till it’s over.

CLICK HERE For Yogi Berra’s Top 50 Witticisms

And yes, THIS cartoon bear is widely acknowledged to be named after Yogi Berra! Click the picture for the “official” story!

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#10: Rogers Hornsby

Nicknamed “The Rajah,” Rogers Hornsby, was a baseball player who COULD do it all! 

At the plate Hornsby was a GIANT of the game!  He is second only to Ty Cobb in lifetime batting average (.358 vs .367), had 2,930 hits, 301 Home Runs, won 2 Triple Crowns, batted .400 or more in a season 3x, his single season (1924)  batting average of .424 has NEVER been matched or surpassed, and is the only player in history to hit 40 home runs in the same year as he batted .400!

This much ability comes with consequences, however.  Hornsby hasd a reputation in the club house as someone who was difficult to get along with and was not well liked by his fellow players. You can’t blame his bad attitude on boozing or drug use though, because Hornsby never smoked, or drank. He DID frequently gamble on horse races during his career, so maybe one too many last-place nags he bet on made him a “grumpy gus.”

His attitude is irrelevant though!  It’s his supreme baseball skills that lands Rogers Hornsby in the Top ten of Dimino’s Top 100!

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#17: Jimmie Foxx

In a 20-year career (1925-1945), Foxx created quite a baseball resume even by Dimino’s Top 100 Standards!

His accomplishments include: Being named an All-Star 9x, he’s a 3x AL MVP Winner,won 2 World Series, was the AL Batting Champ twice, the AL Home Run Leader 4x, the AL RBI leader 3x, was elected to the Philadelphia and Boston halls of fame.  At the plate, had a lifetime batting average of .325, hit 534 Home Runs, 2,646 hits, 1,922 RBIs, and drove in 1,751 runs.

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#12: Greg Maddux - THE Pitcher With Pinpoint Accuracy!

During the 90’s, Greg Maddux was one of 3 Atlanta Braves Pitchers (Including Tom Glavine and John Smoltz) that composed one of the best pitching rotations in history!  During that time, Maddux posted impressive numbers that justify his placement this high on Dimino’s Top 100 list!

Maddux was the first pitcher in baseball history to win the Cy Young Award for four consecutive years (1992–1995),(A feat later matched by only one other pitcher: Randy Johnson.), For those 4 seasons, Maddux had a 75–29 record with a 1.98 earned run average (ERA), while allowing less than one base runner per inning.  In addition, Maddux is the ONLY pitcher to ever win 15 or more games for 17 straight seasons, he holds the record for Gold Glove Awards with 18, is 8th All-Time with 355 wins, he is 1 of only 10 pitchers to ever achieve 300 wins and 3,000 strike outs, and the only one to combine that stat with only 1,000 walks.

On January 8, 2014, he was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, in his first year of eligibility, receiving 97.2% of the votes.

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#13: Randy "The Big Unit" Johnson

When intimidating pitchers come to mind, few can match Randy Johnson.  Firstly, Johnson stands 6′ 10″ tall, so when he took the mound, opposing batters were greeted with a giant who, in his prime, could hurl a fastball consistently over 100MPH with his fastest pitch measured at 102MPH.

Johnson’s career numbers were as impressive as his stature: He was a 10x All Star, a 5x Cy Young Award Winner,a World Series MVP, a Triple Crown Winner, the MLB wins leader in 2002, a 4x ERA Champ, the Strike Out Leader 9x, and Hall of Fame Inductee.  He is credited with 303 Wins against 166 losses, has a lifetime ERA of 3.29, and recorded 4,875 Strikeouts.

Johnson also pitched a perfect game on May 18th, 2004 against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field which was the 17th in all of baseball history and the 7th in the National League.

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Frank Robinson has one accomplishment that no other baseball player can boast about: He is the only player in history to win MVP of both the American and National Leagues!

But wait…there’s more! Robinson was also named Rookie of the Year, was a 2x MVP, a 14x All Star, a Triple Crown Winner, a World Series MVP, a 2x World Series Winner, and currently sits tenth on the all time home run list (586), he drove in over 1,800 runs, stole 208 bases, and had just shy of 3,000 hits! He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame inn 1982 and is currently the Honorary President of the American League.

In addition, Robinson was also became the first black manager in the majors when he coached the Cleveland Indians the last two years he played. He also went on to coach the San Francisco Giants, Bsltimore Orioles and the Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals.

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#15: Sandy Koufax

Sanford “Sandy” Koufax pitched for the Brooklyn/Los Angeled Dodgers for 12 seasons (1955-66) and produced some of the finest examples of ace pitching the game has ever seen.

Looking at his accolades, we see a pitcher whose career included 3 Cy Young Awards, seven All-Star Awards, 2x World Series MVP, 2x MLB Player of the Year, he won 5 ERA Titles, 3 Triple Crowns (Lowest ERA, highest Strikeouts & lowest # of Walks), had 165 wins vs only 87 losses, and 2,396 Strike Outs.

Sadly, Koufax’s career was cut short at 30 when his pitching arm developed arthritis in the elbow.

For his accomplishments, Koufax was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1972 and was the youngest player ever enshrined at age 36!

#16: Barry Bonds*

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Let’s just get this out of the way: Barry Bonds was king of the Baseball Steroid Era Roid-Poppers, and his player stats are forever recorded with an asterisk (*) following them to denote this. That being said, overall as a baseball player he belongs on Dimino’s Top 100 List, and here’s the case for his inclusion.

During Bonds’ 22 seasons in Major League Baseball with the Pittsburgh Pirates and San Francisco Giants he won 7 NL MVP Awards, 14 All-Star Selections, 12 Silver Slugger Awards, 3x MLB Player of the Year, an 8x Gold Glove, hit 762 Home Runs* (The most in baseball history), stole 514 bases, and drove in 1996 runs.  In addition, he holds the single season record for home runs (73* in 2001) and the record for the most walks.

As a central figure in baseball’s steroids scandal In 2007, he was indicted on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice for allegedly lying to the grand jury during the federal government’s investigation of BALCO. The perjury charges against Bonds were dropped and an initial obstruction of justice conviction was overturned in 2015.

In 2018, Bonds was not elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in his sixth of 10 years of eligibility.

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#17 & #28: Jackie Robinson

IT’S DEJA VOUX ALL OVER AGAIN!

There is no doubt that Jackie Robinson’s baseball legacy is his breaking of the color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947.  However, Robinson was also a helluva baseball player, and his ability on the field shows that he’s legit as one of the greatest PLAYERS of all time!

In his 10 year MLB career, Robinson was the recipient of the FIRST Rookie of the Year Award, was an All-Star for 6 seasons straight (1949-1954), won the NL MVP in 1949 (The first black player so honored), played in 6 World Series and won 1 in 1955.

In 1992, to honor Robinson, every team in baseball retired his #42.  He is one of three players to have his number retired by more than one team!

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#18: Tom Seaver

Seaver’s baseball career stretched from 1967 to 1986, and though he played with 4 franchises, his work with the NY Mets is regarded as his career defining period, with a World Series Championship won in 1969.  During that time, Seaver rang up a Rookie of the Year Honor, 3 Cy Young Awards, 311 Wins, 3,640 Strike Outs, 62 Shutouts, and a career 2.86 ERA. 

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#19: Christy Mathewson

Here’s what you need to know about this right handed hurler: 373 Wins, 188 Losses, Lifetime ERA 2.13, 5X ERA Champ, 2,508 Strike Outs (vs. only 848 Walks) and in 1936, he was the first Pitcher enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame in its FIRST Class!

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#20: Grover Cleveland Alexander

There are only a handful of pitchers that can boast the numbers of “Grover Cleveland”” Alexander, and from the jump he performed at a higher level than his peers.  In his rookie year, Alexander led the league with 28 wins, 31 complete games, 367 innings pitched, 7 shoutouts and finished second in total strikeouts. 

Over the course of his career, Alexander led the league in ERA 5x, in Wins 5x, in innings pitched 6x, complete games 5x, and shutouts 5x.  He is a World Series Champion and was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1938.

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#21: Albert Pujols

This is the last active player on Dimino’s list, and he saved one of the best until now: Albert Pujols.

The man is amazing when it comes to his numbers! Currently, he has 633 Home Runs, has driven in 1,982 runs, has 3,082 hits, and a lifetime batting average of .302.  Add to that his 3 MVP Awards, a Rookie of the Year Award, his 10X All-Star Awards, 6 Silver Sluggers, 2 Gold Gloves, 3 Major League Player of the Year Awards, and a National League Championship Series MVP, and it’s easy to see why Pujols sits where he does on this list!

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#22: Johnny Bench

There are some names that are permanently linked with a position in baseball, and when it comes to catchers, there’s few names bigger than Johnny Bench.

A lifetime Cincinnati Red, Bench rang up an impressive baseball resume over his 17-year career.  Starting with his Rookie Of the Year Award, add 14 All-Star Awards, 10 Gold Glove Awards, 2x League MVP, a World Series MVP, Major League Player of the Year, and 2x World Series Champion. 

At the plate, Bench totaled up 389 Home Runs, 2,048 hits, and a lifetime batting average of .267.  Bench also won such awards as the Lou Gehrig Award (1975), the Babe Ruth Award (1976), and the Hutch Award (1981).

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#23: Warren Spahn

Known for his “high kick pitching style,” Warren Spahn is regarded as one of the most formidable pitchers the game has ever seen!  Let’s break down the stats: 363 wins (6th most in MLB), led the league in wins 8x, won 3 ERA titles, 4 Strikeout Crowns, had a lifetime ERA of 3.09, a Cy Young Award winner, a 1957 World Series Winner, and a Hall of Fame Inductee.

In addition, Spahn is one of the best batting pitchers having hit at least 1 home run in 17 straight seasons and is second in total home runs with 37 (Behind Wes Ferrell).

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#24: Ty Cobb

Dimino is INSANE, Right?  TY Cobb…the GREATEST hitter in the history of the MLB is only ranked #24?

Let’s look at the man’s accomplishments: To this day, Ty Cobb is #1 for lifetime batting average (.366) and  #1 for Batting Titles (12).  He set a total of 90 records over his career, many of which stood for over 50 years. His stats of note also include 4,189 career hits, 3,035 Games Played, 11,429 at bats, 892 stolen bases, he stole home 54 times, and 5 times, he stole 2nd, 3rd AND home!  Add to that a Triple Crown Win (Most HRs, Hits & Best Average) and his Hall of Fame induction, and it totals up to one of the greatest players in thie history of the game.

But Dimino has him at #24 in the Top 100!  Why?

Because of the era he played in.  Like Cy Young, Cobb played in the era of part time ball players and never saw the level of talent present in the Majors today.  For playing ball during an era when people talked about “That New-Fangled Flying Machine those crazy Wright Brothers made,” Cobb gets dropped to this position.

In addition, it has been reported that Ty was something of a bigoted jerk.  While that cannot be confirmed with ABSOLUTE CERTAINTY, it has been reported enough to the point there must be a modicum of truth to it, so add a couple of more demerits for Cobb’s ‘jagoffiness!”

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#25: Derek Jeter

If there was any player that could be described as a team’s “linchpin,” that player would certainly be Derek Jeter for the New York Yankees!  During his 20-year run as a Yankee, Jeter was a central figure in their success through the late 90’s and early 2000’sprimarily  due to his hitting, but also for his smart base running and leadership skills.

Jeter is the career leader for the Yankees with 3,465 hits, and 658 Stolen Bases and leads the team in hitting stats in 4 other areas.  In addition, he won 5 Silver Slugger Awards, 5 Gold Gloves, a World Series MVP Award, was a 14x All-Star and Rookie of the Year. In 2017, Jeter’s #2 was retired by the Yankees.

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#26 - Lefty Grove

Let’s just get his out of the way…yes his nickname was “Lefty” and YES, it’s because he was a left-handed pitcher and YES that’s one of the most unoriginal nicknames in the history of baseball.

Now that we have that out of the way…

Grove was a nasty pitcher who played for the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox over a 17 year career.  His numbers are impressive having totaled 300 wins in his career compared to only 141 losses.  In addition, he won the pitching Triple Crown (Best in wins, strikeouts and ERA) twice in 1929 and 1931, led the American League in wins in 4 seperate seasons, was a 6x all star, and was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1947 and is widely regarded as one of the best left handed pitchers in history.

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#28: Jackie Robinson

There is no doubt that Jackie Robinson’s baseball legacy is his breaking of the color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947.  However, Robinson was also a helluva baseball player, and his ability on the field shows that he’s legit as one of the greatest PLAYERS of all time!

In his 10 year MLB career, Robinson was the recipient of the FIRST Rookie of the Year Award, was an All-Star for 6 seasons straight (1949-1954), won the NL MVP in 1949 (The first black player so honored), played in 6 World Series and won 1 in 1955.

In 1992, to honor Robinson, every team in baseball retired his #42.  He is one of three players to have his number retired by more than one team!

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#29: Mike Schmidt

When it comes to crowning a king for a position in baseball, it is widely recognized that Mike Schmidt is the top of the heap at Third Base!

Over a career that spanned 17 years with the Phillies, Schmidt was a 12x All-Star, a 3x NL MVP Recipient, smashed 548 Home Runs, he led the NL 8x in home runs, drove in 1,595 runs, and as a fielder he won 10 Gold Gloves!

Schmidt was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1995.

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#30: Nolan Ryan

When it comes to pitching, few baseball players have numbers that rival Nolan Ryan’s!

For starters, Ryan’s career is the longest-lasting in the history of baseball which spanned 4 decades (60’s through 90’s) and lasted a total of 27 years!  During that stretch, Ryan pitched for the NY Mets, Houston Astros, California Angels and Texas Rangers with the last three organizations retiring Ryan’s number!  Here’s some other numbers of note: Ryan’s 5,714 strikeouts is a MLB record that will probably never be duplicated, he had more strikeouts over his career than innings pitched, and he is the all-time leader in no-hitters (7).

Weirdly, Nolan Ryan NEVER won a Cy Young Award despite his prowess from the mound!

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#31: Chipper Jones

Drafted first overall in the MLB 1990 Draft, Larry “Chipper” Jones lived up to and in some cases, exceeded the expectations that are typically placed on the first overall pick!

In his 19 year career as the third baseman of with the Atlanta Braves (Except for 002-2003 when he played left field), Jones built a reputation for solid defense and exceptional batting skills.  He was an 8x All-Star, Rookie of the Year for 1990, a NL MVP for 199 and 2000, the MLB Batting Champ in 2008 (Won with a .364 Average),and a Silver Slugger Award Winner for Third Base. His notable stats include: a .303 career batting average (He is also the only switch hitter to maintain a .300 average from BOTH sides of the plate), he hit 468 home runs, drove in over 1,600 runs,

On June 28, 2013, the Braves retired Jones’ number 10 and inducted him into the team’s Hall of Fame. On July 29, 2018, he was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.

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#33 - Rickey Henderson

From 1979 to 2003 the “Man of Steal” Rickey Henderson, made life a nightmare for opposing pitchers!  Widely regarded as the All-Time Greatest Lead Off Batter, Henderson holds the MLB records for: Stolen Bases (1,406), Runs, Unintentional Walks and Leadoff Home Runs. In addition, Henderson holds the single-season record for stolen bases with 130, and is the ONLY player in American League History to steal 100+ bases in a single season and he accomplished this feat THREE TIMES!

Other Accolades Henderson has earned include: 1990 ALMVP, 12x Stolen Base Champ, he led the league in runs 5x and was a first-ballot Hall of Fame inductee in 2009!

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#34: Bob Feller

When “Bullet Bob” Feller took the mound, fans of the Cleveland indians cheered and their opponents groaned!  For 18 seasons, Feller pitched in the Majors over two stints.  The first was from 1936 to 1941, and the second was from 1945 to 1956 with his Naval service in World War 2 (Which he volunteered for the day after the Pearl Harbor Attack) sandwiched in between. While in the majors, Feller played in 570 games, pitched 3,827 innings and posted a record of 266–162, with 279 complete games, 44 shutouts, and a 3.25 ERA. In addition, he was an 8x All Star, won the Pitching Title once, was a winner in the 1948

Baseball Hall of Fame member Ted Williams called Feller “the fastest and best pitcher I ever saw during my career.” Hall of Famer Stan Musial believed he was “probably the greatest pitcher of our era.” He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962 on his first ballot appearance; at the time only three players ever had a higher percentage of ballot votes.

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#35 - Mariano Rivera

Signaled by his foreboding entrance song, Metallica’s “Enter Sandman“, Mariano Rivera would take the mound and proceed to mow down just about every batter he faced for the New York Yankees for 17 seasons.  During that stretch, Rivera totaled 13 All Star Appearances, was a 5 time World Series Champ, rang up 652 Saves, finished 952 games, won the AL Rolaids Relief Man Award 5x, The Delivery Man of the Year Award 3x,

spent most of his career as a relief pitcher and served as the Yankees’ closer for 17 seasons. A thirteen-time All-Star and five-time World Series champion, he is MLB’s career leader in saves (652) and games finished (952). Rivera won five American League (AL) Rolaids Relief Man Awards and three Delivery Man of the Year Awards, and he finished in the top three in voting for the AL Cy Young Award four times, was named the 1999 World Series Most Valuable Player (MVP) and the 2003 AL Championship Series MVP, and he holds several postseason records, including lowest earned run average (ERA) (0.70) and most saves (42).

Regarded as one of the most dominant relievers in MLB history, Rivera embodied longevity and consistency uncommon to the closer role, saving at least 25 games in 15 consecutive seasons and posting an ERA under 2.00 in 11 seasons, both of which are records, his career 2.21 ERA and 1.00 WHIP are the lowest in the live-ball era among qualified pitchers.

In 2013, the Yankees retired his uniform number 42; and was the last major league player to wear the number full-time, following its league-wide retirement in honor of Jackie Robinson.

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#36 - David Ortiz

“Big Papi” started his career with the Mariners, was traded to the Twins, and spent the remainder of his 20-year career in Boston with the Red Sox.  Here, Ortiz gained his reputation as a Top-Notch Slugger.  His prowess at the plate earned him 10 All-Star Awards, he was a 3x World Series Champ, a Silver Slugger 7x, smacked 541 home runs (17th on the MLB all-time home run list), 1,768 RBIs (22nd all-time) and a .286 batting average. As a Designated Hitter, he is the all-time leader in MLB history for home runs (485), runs batted in (RBIs) (1,569), and hits (2,192).

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#37 - George Brett

Few baseball players can claim a career that lasts 21 years, but even fewer can claim that their entire time in the bigs was with one team.  George Brett is such a player and he was a lifetime Kansas City Royal.

Brett was a monster at the plate belting out 3,154 hits (Tops for 3rd Basemen), and only one of 4 who can claim over 3,000 hits, 300 Home Runs, and a  lifetime batting average over .300!  In addition, he was a 3X Silver Slugger, MLB Player of the Year, and a 13x All Star.

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#38 - Pete Rose

If ever there was a player whose numbers ranked him as one of the best of baseball, it would definitely be Pete Rose!  Over his career, “Charlie Hustle” set MLB records for hits )4,256), he played in 3,562 games (1st All Time), at bats (14,000+) and outs (10,000+).  In addition, he won 3 World Series, was an All Star 17x, won 2 Gold Gloves, was a 3x Batting Title Holder, was Rookie of The Year, and a Silver Slugger Award.
Despite leading MLB in numerous categories, Pete Rose finds himself excluded permanently from admission to the Baseball Hall of Fame due to his gambling on baseball while he was Player / Manager of the Cincinnati Reds.  While there is some talk about eventually making him eligible, nobody is holding their breath expecting the ban to be lifted anytime soon.

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#39 - Bob "Hoot" Gibson

For 17 seasons (1959-1975), St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Bob “Hoot” Goibson was a dominant force!  Over his career, he tallied up 251 wins, 3,117 strikeouts, and earned a lifetime  2.91 earned run average.

A nine-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion, he won two Cy Young Awards and the 1968 National League Most Valuable Player Award. In 1981, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. The Cardinals retired his uniform number 45 in September 1975 and inducted him into the team Hall of Fame in 2014.

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#40 - Cal Ripken

To say that all Cal Ripken did was “show up and play baseball” is a disservice that sells his career short!  Showing up is one thing, but showing up every day and EXCELLING is another, and Ripkin falls into that latter category.

First and foremost, Ripken “showed up” more than ANY other baseball player in history playing 2,632 games STRAIGHT!  The only other player that comes close to Cal is Lou Gehrig, and he’s 502 games behind!  For over 21 seasons in the majors playing for the Baltimore Orioles, Ripken recorded 3,184 hits, 431 home runs, and 1,695 runs batted in. He won two Gold Glove Awards for his defense, was a 19-time All-Star, and was twice named the American League MVP.

In 2007, he was elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility, and currently has the fourth highest voting percentage of all time (98.53%).

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#41 - Charlie Gehringer

Let’s get the weirdness out of the way at the start: Charlie Gheringer batted left handed and threw with his right.  Yeah, that’s unconventional, but one cannot argue the results on offense or defense!

Gehringer was a beast at the plate compiling a .320 lifetime batting average and during his run had seven seasons with more than 200 hits! Over the life of his career, Gehringer had career totals of 2,839 hits and 574 doubles, he led the Tigers to three American League pennants (1934, 1935, and 1940) and one World Series Championship (1935). Gehringer hit .379 in the 1934 World Series, and .375 in the 1935 Series. Gehringer was the American League batting champion in 1937 with a .371 average and was also named the American League’s Most Valuable Player that same year.

Defiensively, Gehringer was no slouch and is regarded as one of the best-fielding second basemen in history, having led all American League second basemen in fielding percentage and assists seven times. With 7,068 assists, Gehringer ranks second highest in major league history for a second baseman, and also collected 5,369 putouts as a second baseman (the 6th highest total for a second baseman) and 1,444 double plays (the 7th highest total for a second baseman). He recorded a career .976 fielding percentage.

Known for his consistency as a hitter and fielder, Gehringer was given the nickname “The Mechanical Man” by Yankee pitcher Lefty Gomez. Teammate Doc Cramer quipped: “You wind him up Opening Day and forget him.”

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#42 - Satchel Paige

Often regarded as “The Greatest Pitcher Who Ever Lived,” Satchell Paige became a legend in his lifetime for his pitching mastery, his longevity in the game, and for the crowds he attracted throughout his career. Here’s the riub though…Paige played in the Negro Leagues until the age of 42 when he became the Major League’s oldest rookie (A record he holds to this day!) after signing with the Cleveland Indians. After a few seasons, he played with the St. Louis Browns until age 47, and represented them in the All-Star Game in 1952 and 1953. Paige was also the first Negro league player to pitch in a World Series, in 1948, and was the first electee of the Committee on Negro Baseball Leagues to be inducted in the National Baseball Hall of Fame, in 1971.

In one final hurrah, Paige pitched 3 shutout innings with the Oakland athletics at the age of 59, perhaps giving birth to one of his favorite sayings: “Age is a question of mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it doesn’t matter.”

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#43 - Alex Rodriguez

There is no question that A-Rod is one of the greatest players in baseball history, and SURELY he should place higher on this list than number 43.  After all, Rodriguez racked up a .295 lifetime batting average, bashed 696 home runs, drove in over 2,000 runs(RBI), scored over 2,000 runs scored, holds the record for grand slams at 25, and totaled over 3,000 career hits.

But wait…there’s more!

Rodriguez is also a 14-time All-Star, he won three American League Most Valuable Player Awards, earned ten Silver Slugger Awards, and on defense, earned two Gold Glove Awards. 

So HOW is A-Rod NOT top 5 in this list?

Simply: The use of performance-enhancing drugs.  Rodriguez was suspended from baseball not once, but TWICE for PED use.  As a result, there’s no way to accurately assess how much of his stellar numbers can be “attributed to better living through chemistry.”  Because of this, A-Rod finds himself just outside of the top 40 in Dimino’s list!

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#44 - Josh Gibson

When people called Babe Ruth “The White Josh Gibson,” you know Gibson was the REAL DEAL! Unfortunately, Gibson was relegated to playing in the Negro Leagues and as a result never got the public recognition he deserved.

But among players and baseball historians, Gibson is a LEGEND!  He’s widely regarded as one of the greatest power hitters the game has ever seen and reportedly hit a long ball over 500 feet!

Gibson played for the Homestead Grays from 1930 to 1931, the Pittsburgh Crawfords from 1932 to 1936, and returned to the Grays from 1937 to 1939 and 1942 to 1946. In 1937, he played for Ciudad Trujillo in Trujillo‘s Dominican League and from 1940 to 1941, he played in the Mexican League for Rojos del Águila de Veracruz. Gibson served as the first manager of the Santurce Crabbers, one of the most historic franchises of the Puerto Rico Baseball League.

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#45 - Hank Greenberg

Do NOT let the numbers fool you! NOTHING you see bout Hank Greenberg’s career numbers says he should be on this list, let alone in the Hall of Fame. But what the numbers DON’T tel you is that Greenberg gave up three years of his baseball career (1941-1944) to fight in World War 2, having enlisted the day after The Pearl Harbor Attack. But when he played, he was a dominant force! He had a lifetime batting average of .313, hit 331 home runs, and drove in over 1200 runs.
Being of the Jewish faith, Greenberg often was the subject of bigoted insults cast from the fans in the stands. On one occasion, however, one of his teammates insulted him, but did not reveal his identity. Greenberg’s response: He stood up in front of his entire team in the locker room and challenged whomever it was who insulted him to reveal his identity. When nobody responded, he threatened to fight the whole team! Nobody stood to fight, and nobody on his team ever slung a bigoted slur at him again!

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#46 - Manny Ramirez

For 19 seasons, Manny Ramirez was a pain in the keester for opposing pitchers in the Majors!  Known for being an EXTREMELY difficult out at the plate, he won 9 Silver Slugger Awards, One Batting Title, had a lifetime batting average of .312, jacked 555 home runs (one of only 25 to get over 500), and drove over 1,800 runs across the plate.  His 21 grand slams place him third all time in that category and his 29 post-season home runs is the most in MLB history!

If you’re looking for offense in the post season, then Ramirez was your man!

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#47 - Ernie Banks

It’s a rare occasion when a ball player spends his entire career with a team, but Ernie Banks is just such a man. Nicknamed “Mr. Cub” and “Mr. Sunshine” (For his infectious positive attitude), Banks played shortstop and first base for the Chicago Cubs between 1953 and 1971.  During that time, Banks racked up 2 MVP awards, was a 14x All-Star, won a Gold Glove, and hit 512 home runs which was good enough to get him into Cooperstown in 1977.

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#48 - Ivan "Pudge" Rodriguez

Proof positive that being a D-Bag takes a back seat to baseball talent, appearing at #48 is one of the best defensive catchers of all time, Ivan “Pudge Rodriguez. During his career, he played for the Texas Rangers, Florida Marlins, Detroit Tigers, New York Yankees, Houston Astros and Washington Nationals.

Rodríguez won the World Series with the Florida Marlins in 2003, and lost the 2006 World Series with the Tigers. His stats include: The major league career leader in putouts by catchers, set an MLB record by catching his 2,227th game (Passing Carlton Fisk), had the best caught stealing percentage of any major league catcher, at 45.68% and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017 receiving 76% of the votes cast.

Shortly thereafter his ego ballooned and he decided his lawn needed a statue of himself.

Lat’s hope the pigeons enjoy it more than us!

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When a mirror isn’t enough to satisfy your ego, get a statue in your back yard just like Pudge!
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#49- Mike Trout

Mike Trout is currently playing for the Los Angeles Angels where he’s piled up some impressive stats since 2012. He’s a six-time MLB All-Star, received the American League’s Most Valuable Player award in 2014 and 2016, was Rookie of the Year in 2012 (Winning it unanimously!), is a 5x Silver Slugger, and a 7x All Star.  His contract with the Angels extends to the 2020 season, and by then his reputation and accomplishments should be GREATLY increased!

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#50 - Eddie Collins

Dimino thinks that his pick for #50, Eddie Collins, is probably looks the least like an athlete than anyone listed to this point and from this point on!  At 5ft. 9in., he hardly possessed an intimidating presence when he stepped into the batters box, but he hit like nobody’s business racking up a lifetime batting average of .333, 1,299 RBI, 741 Stolen bases, and was a 4x World Series Champ!

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#51: Pedro Martinez

Initially a Los Angeles Dodger, Pedro Martinez was traded to the Montreal Expos (Now Washington Senators) because he was “too small.” 

BIG mistake for the Dodgers!

As Martinez’s career continued in Montreal, then Boston, he racked up some insane pitching stats! From 2002 to 2006 Martinez held the MLB record for the highest career winning percentage by a pitcher with at least 200 decisions, and with a final record of 219 wins and 100 losses, he retired with the fourth-highest winning percentage in history.  By the time his career ended, Martinez racked up a lifetime ERA of 2.93, reached the 3,000 strikeout mark in fewer innings than any pitcher except Randy Johnson, and is the only pitcher to compile over 3,000 strikeouts with fewer than 3,000 innings pitched! His career strikeout rate of 10.04 per 9 innings trails only Randy Johnson (10.61) among pitchers with over 1,500 innings.

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#52 - Tony Gwynn

It’s a rarity in baseball for a player to remain with a team throughout his entire career, but Tony Gwynn was such a man! Nicknamed Mr. Padre“, Gwynn began his career in San Diego in 1982 and remained there for 20 seasons! Diuring this time, Gwynn won 8 batting titles (tied for the most in National League history), maintained a career .338 career batting average while never hitting below .309 in any full season, was a 15-time All-Star, and was recognized for his skills on offense and defense with seven Silver Slugger Awards and five Gold Glove Awards. He played in the only two World Series appearances in San Diego’s franchise history and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007, his first year of eligibility!

Add to all of that the fact that Dimino regards Gwynn as his “favorite out of town player,” and his appearance in this list is assured!

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#53 - Ken Griffey Jr.

An unbelievably gifted center fielder and hitter, George Kenneth Griffey Jr.’s 22-year MLB career is definitely one with the stats to back up his placement on this list.  Griffey was one of the most powerful hitters banging out 630 home runs over his career (6th most in history), is tied for the most consecutive games with a homer (8), and was equally exceptional at defense winning 10 Gold Glove awards!  In addition, Griffey is one of only 29 players in baseball history to have appeared in Major League games in four different calendar decades!

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#54 - Miguel Cabrera

Dimino takes time to recognize a ball player who is STILL playing the game and who he believes is a lock for the Hall of Fame when he chooses to retire: Miguel Cabrera.

What puts Cabrera on this list is his reputation as one of the best hitters in baseball history, combining great power, a high batting average, a good walk rate and a low strikeout percentage! Cabrera hit 30 or more home runs during ten separate seasons, drove in over 100 runs in 12 separate seasons (Including 11 consecutive seasons, 2004–14), and to this point in his career, has a .317 batting average.

Currently Cabrera is the first baseman for the Detroit Tigers, and since his debut in 2003 he has been a two-time American League MVP, a 4x AL batting champion, and an 11-time MLB All-Star. In 2012, he claimed the 17th MLB Triple Crown, the first to do so in 45 seasons!

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#55 - Jim Palmer

Dimino says that he’s at the point in his list where he is starting to load up on pictures, and there’s few that can match the skills of Jim Palmer!
Palmer
played all of his 19 years in  the Majors with the Baltimore Orioles (1965–67, 1969–84) and was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1990. During the 1970’s, Palmer was the winning pitcher in 186 games which was the most wins in that decade by any MLB pitcher. He also won at least twenty games in eight seasons, received three Cy Young Awards, won four Gold Gloves during the decade, and his 268 career victories are an Orioles record. Most amazing stat:  Palmer was also one of the rare pitchers who never allowed a grand slam in any major league contest!

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#56: Roger "Rocket" Clemens

Dimino isn’t crazy about adding Roger Clemens to this list.  Why? Bbecause many people believe Clemens may have cheated by using performance enhancing drugs, however since nothing was ever proven conclusively, one can only assume his numbers are legit.

Clemens pitched for 24 seasons in The Bigs for four teams and was one of the most dominant pitchers in major league history, ringing up 354 wins, a 3.12 earned run average (ERA), 4,672 strikeouts,  was an 11-time All-Star, two-time World Series champion, and won seven Cy Young Awards during his career (More than any other pitcher in history).

Within the Mitchell Report, Clemens was alleged to have used anabolic steroids late in his career by his former trainer, Brian McNamee . Clemens denied these allegations under oath before the United States Congress which led congressional leaders to refer his case to the Justice Department on suspicion of perjury. On August 19, 2010, a federal grand jury at the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., indicted Clemens on six felony counts involving perjury, false statements and Contempt of Congress. Clemens pleaded not guilty, but proceedings were complicated by prosecutorial misconduct which led to a mistrial. After a second trial in June 2012, Clemens was found not guilty on all six counts of lying to Congress.

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#57 - Al Simmons

This baseball player was born with the name “Alois Szymanski,” but after his baseball career took off, he got sick of announcers screwing up his name, so he changed his last name to “Simmons.”

Simmons played for two decades in Major League Baseball (MLB) as an outfielder and had his best years with Connie Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics during the late 1920s and early 1930s. In between, Simmons played with the Chicago White Sox, Detroit Tigers, Washington Senators, Boston Braves, Cincinnati Reds and Boston Red Sox.  During this time, he racked up a lifetime batting average of .329, had almost 3,000 hits, drove in over 1,500 runs, launched 308 home runs, won 2 batting titles and was a 3x All Star!  Add to that a couple of World Series wins, and you have the makings of a Hall of Fame Inductee which occurred for Simmons in 1953.

After his playing career ended, Simmons served as a coach for the Athletics and the Cleveland Indians.

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#58 - Steve Carlton

Among lefty pitchers, Steve Carlton has the second-most lifetime strikeouts and the second-most lifetime wins (11th overall), but that’s not the end to some of this filthy stats!  Carlton was the first pitcher to win four Cy Young Awards in a career, held the lifetime strikeout record several times between 1982 and 1984 (Before Nolan Ryan passed him), he’s the last National League pitcher to win 25 or more games in a season, and the last pitcher from any team to throw more than 300 innings in a season. On the downside, he also holds the record with the most career balks of any pitcher, with 90 (double the second on the all-time list, Bob Welch). One of his most remarkable records was accounting for nearly half (46%) of his team’s wins, when he won 27 games for the last-place (59-97) 1972 Phillies.

For that amazing left arm, Steve Carlton lands at #58 on Dimino’s List!

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#59 - Mel Ott

For such a small man (Only 5ft 7in), Mel Ott was deceptively powerful at the plate!  Ott’s plate prowess resulted in his becoming a six-time NL home run leader (1932, 1934, 1936–38, and 1942.), and led the New York Giants in home runs and from 1928 to 1945 (18 years straight!). No other player has led his team in more consecutive years in a single Triple Crown category. In addition, he was both the youngest player to hit 100 home runs and the first National Leaguer to hit 500 home runs. He passed Rogers Hornsby to become the all-time NL home run leader in 1937 and held that title until Willie Mays passed him in 1966.

Since he was so feared at the plate, Ott had a habit of getting walked.  He led the NL in this category six times (1929, 1931–33, 1937 and 1942), drew five walks in a game three times, and set the NL record for most walks in a doubleheader with six, on October 5, 1929 and again on April 30, 1944. He tied an MLB record by drawing a walk in seven consecutive plate appearances (June 16 through 18, 1943).  He twice scored six runs in a game, on August 4, 1934 and on April 30, 1944.

Mel Ott is the youngest major leaguer to ever hit for the cycle, was the first NL player to post eight consecutive 100-RBI seasons, and only Willie Mays, Sammy Sosa, Chipper Jones, and Albert Pujols have since joined him.

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#60 - Carl Hubbell

Nicknamed “The Meal Ticket” and “King Carl“, Hubbell was a member of the New York Giants in the National League from 1928 to 1943 and  remained on the team’s payroll for the rest of his life, long after their move to San Francisco.

Twice voted the National League’s MVP, Hubbell was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1947. During 1936 and 1937, Hubbell set the major league record for consecutive wins by a pitcher with 24 and is perhaps best remembered for his performance in the 1934 All-Star Game, when he struck out five of the game’s great hitters in succession with his primary pitch: the screwball.

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#61 - Roberto Clemente

Roberto Enrique Clemente Walker played 18 seasons for the Pittsburgh Pirates and was posthumously inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1973, becoming the first Latin American and Caribbean player to be enshrined. His untimely death from a plane crach while on a Caribbean charity mission established the precedent that, as an alternative to the five-year retirement period, a player who has been deceased for at least six months is eligible for entry into the Hall of Fame.  Yes…he was THAT GOOD!

Clemente was an All-Star for twelve seasons, played in fifteen All-Star Games, was the NL Most Valuable Player in 1966, the NL batting leader in 1961, 1964, 1965, and 1967, and a Gold Glove Award winner for twelve consecutive seasons from 1961 through 1972. His batting average was over .300 for thirteen seasons with 3,000 hits over his major league career. He also played in two World Series championships. Clemente is the first Latin American and Caribbean player to help win a World Series as a starter (1960), to receive an NL MVP Award (1966), and to receive a World Series MVP Award (1971).

He was involved in charity work in Latin American and Caribbean countries during the off-seasons, often delivering baseball equipment and food to those in need. On December 31, 1972, he died in a plane crash while en route to deliver aid to earthquake victims in Nicaragua. He was 38 years old.

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#62 - Adrián Beltré

Among foreign-born players, one name sits at the top when it comes to batting: Adrián Beltré!

What’s he done? Beltré is the fifth major leaguer to hit at least 100 home runs for three different teams, has hit at least 20 home runs in 12 different seasons, and in five seasons, he drove in at least 100 runs. In 2004, he hit a major league-leading 48 home runs while playing for the Dodgers, was the team MVP of the Red Sox in 2010, and tied the major league lead for hits in 2013 while playing for the Rangers. Beltré is the only big leaguer to hit for the cycle three times at the same stadium, Globe Life Park in Arlington. He is the sixth player with a three-home-run game in both the regular season and postseason, and just the second with both a three-home-run game and cycle in the same week. On July 30, 2017, he became the 31st player in MLB history to reach 3,000 hits and the first from the Dominican Republic.

Dimino thinks this is the man to call when a hot bat is needed and it lands him here on his Top 100!

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#63 - Carl "Yaz" Yastrzemski

There are very few “lifers” in the Major Leagues, but Carl “Yaz” Yastrzemski played his entire 23-year baseball career with the Boston Red Sox (1961–1983) and became one of the all time “faces of the franchise.” He was primarily a left fielder, but also played 33 games as a third baseman and mostly was a first baseman and designated hitter later in his career. Yastrzemski is an 18-time All-Star,  woneven Gold Gloves, is a member of the 3,000 hit club, and Yastrzemski was the first American League player in that club to also accumulate over 400 home runs. He is second on the all-time list for games played, third for total at-bats, and the Red Sox’ all-time leader in career RBIs, runs, hits, singles, doubles, total bases, games played, and is third on the team’s list for home runs behind Ted Williams and David Ortiz.

In 1967 Yastrzemski achieved a peak in his career, leading the Red Sox to the American League pennant for the first time in over two decades and was voted the 1967 American League MVP.

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#64: Tris Speaker

Considered one of the best offensive and defensive center fielders in the history of Major League Baseball, Tris Speaker compiled a career batting average of .345, HIS 792 career doubles represents an MLB career record, and his 3,514 hits are fifth best all-time. Defensively, Speaker holds career records for assists, double plays, and unassisted double plays by an outfielder. His fielding glove was known as the place “where triples go to die.”

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#65: Frankie Frisch

Frisch played baseball, football, and basketball at Fordham University (New York City) where his speed earned him the name “The Fordham Flash” which stuck with him throughout his baseball career. Frisch went directly before graduating to the Giants in 1919. He played the infield, mainly at second base, through the 1926 season and was then traded to the St. Louis Cardinals, where he played at second and third base through the 1937 season and also managed (1933–38).

He was a switch hitter who hit for an average of .300 or more in 13 of his 19 seasons and over his entire career, was north of .300.

In addition to his solid batting average, Frisch employed his tremendous speed, leading the league in stolen bases for three seasons in 1921 (49), 1927 (48), and in 1931 (28).

He later managed the Pittsburgh Pirates (1940–46) and the Chicago Cubs (1949–51), and became a radio sports broadcaster in the 1940s and a radio and television broadcaster in New York City in the 1950s.

Frisch was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1947.

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#66 - Reggie Jackson

Nicknamed “Mr. October” for his clutch hitting in the postseason, Reggie Jackson played for the Athletics and the Yankees helping Oakland win five consecutive AL West divisional pennants, three consecutive American League pennants and three consecutive World Series titles, from 1971 to 1975. Jackson also helped New York win four American League East divisional pennants, three American League pennants and two consecutive World Series titles, from 1977 to 1981. He also helped the California Angels win two AL West divisional pennants in 1982 and 1986.

Jackson hit 563 career home runs (He hit three consecutive home runs at Yankee Stadium in the clinching game 6 of the 1977 World Series) and was an American League (AL) All-Star for 14 seasons. He won two Silver Slugger Awards, the AL Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in 1973, two World Series MVP Awards, and the Babe Ruth Award in 1977. The Yankees and Athletics retired his team uniform number in 1993 and 2004.

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#67 - Al Kaline

Nicknamed “Mr. Tiger“, Kaline played his entire 22-year baseball career with the Detroit Tigers.  During that stretch, he racked up 18 All-Star Game appearances, 10 Gold Gloves, won a batting title and a World Series Title.  Manager Billy Martin once said, “I have always referred to Al Kaline as ‘Mister Perfection’. He does it all – hitting, fielding, running, throwing – and he does it with that extra touch of brilliancy that marks him as a super ballplayer… Al fits in anywhere, at any position in the lineup and any spot in the batting order.

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#68 - Cy Young

Dimino placing the legendary Denton True “Cy” Young at #68 in the Top 100 seems like sacrilege.  After all, Young STILL holds the major league records for most career innings pitched (7,356), most career games started (815), and most complete games (749), but he also retired with 316 losses, the most in MLB history. In addition, Cy Young’s 76 career shutouts are fourth all-time, he won at least 30 games in a season five times, with ten other seasons of 20 or more wins, he pitched three no-hitters, including the third perfect game in baseball history, first in baseball’s “modern era”.  Shouldn’t that put Young in the top 20?  Other sports analysts think so, but ultimately the era that Young played (1890-1911) in may be the reason for his “low” ranking on this list since Dimino has “no barometer” for him. Young played in the “old time” era of baseball where players were only part time and also held full-time jobs.  In a nutshell, Dimino’s thinking Young may have faced a bunch of tomato cans that “padded his stats.”

In a different time, Cy Young might rank higher, but in this one, he’s #68!

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#69 - Wade Boggs

In an 18-year baseball career with the Boston Red Sox, the New York Yankees, and the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, Boggs notched 12 straight All-Star appearances (Third only to Brooks Robinson and George Brett in number of consecutive appearances as a third baseman!), had over 3,000 hits in his career, was a Gold Glove twice, and a Silver Slugger 8X!

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#70 - Rod Carew

Everybody loves the long ball, but Rod Carew made a hall of fame career even though he only hit 92 over his career.  How?  He was a human hitting machine when he got to the plate with a career featuring over 3,000 hits, a lifetime batting average of .328, led the American League in batting average for 7 years (4 years STRAIGHT from 1972 – 1975), and was an 18X All Star! When it’s all said and done, Carew was the man teams wanted at the plate when runs needed to be driven in!

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#71 - Juan Marichal

191 wins in the 1960’s makes Juan Marichal the winningest pitcher of the 60’s with 197 complete games and an amazing lifetime ERA of 2.89!  He was known for a high leg kick, pinpoint precision with his pitches and no fear of targeting a batter’s head with a pitch to intimidate him! The only thing he’s lacking is a “defining moment” that would allow him to step out from the shadows of other pitchers of the era like Sandy Koufax and Bob Gibson.

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#72 - Jim Thome

Power hitting Thome played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball, from 1991 to 2012 for six different teams, most notably the Cleveland Indians during the 1990s and early 2000s. Thome was prolific at the plate hitting 612 home runs during his career—the eighth-most all time and the second fastest to reach that milestone—along with 2,328 hits, 1,699 runs batted in, and a .276 batting average, was a member of five All-Star teams and won a Silver Slugger Award in 1996.  Most of all, he was a “team player” who was willing to do whatever was asked of him in order to win.

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#73 - Mickey Cochrane

Nicknamed “Black Mike“, Cochrane was a baseball player, manager and coach who playedas a catcher for the Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers. Cochrane was considered one of the best catchers in baseball history and was chosen as the American League’s Most Valuable Player in 1928 and he appeared in the World Series from 1929 to 1931. Cochrane’s career batting average of .320 stood as a record for MLB catchers until 2009. Cochrane’s baseball career as a player ended abruptly after a near-fatal head injury from a bean ball in 1937. After his professional baseball career, he served in the United States Navy in World War II and ran an automobile business.

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#74 - Joe Morgan

Nicknamed “Little Joe” for his diminutive stature (5ft 7in), Joe Morgan played like a man 10ft tall!  Morgan played for the Houston Astros, Cincinnati Reds, San Francisco Giants, Philadelphia Phillies, and Oakland Athletics from 1963 to 1984 and won two World Series championships with the Reds in 1975 and 1976. In those championship years, Morgan was also named the National League Most Valuable Player.

Considered one of the greatest second basemen of all-time, Morgan was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1990. He became a baseball broadcaster for ESPN after his retirement, hosts a weekly nationally syndicated radio show for Sports USA, and is currently a special adviser to the Cincinnati Reds.

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#75 - Eddie Murray

On the field, Eddie Murray was fantastic!  He was Rookie of the Year, an 8x All-Star, 3x Gold Glove, 8x All Star, hit over 500 home runs, plated almost 2,000 runs, and has been described as the 5th best overall first baseman in history!  Off the field, he had a reputation for being “not such a nice guy,” and on one occasion, even refused to sign a teammate’s baseball.  But since it’s what happens on the diamond that counts, Murray finds himself here at #75 on Dimino’s list.

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#76 - John Smoltz

It’s tough to top Atlanta Braves Pitcher John Smoltz because he’s done just about EVERYTHING a pitcher can do!  Cy Young award?  Check.  World Series Winner?  Check.  15-4 Post Season lifetime record?  Check!  Add in his 8 All Star awards, a Silver Slugger award, and a NLCS MVP…check, check, and CHECK! PLUS:Smoltz began his career as a starter, moved to the bullpen after injury and then RETURNED to the starting rotation at 39 years old, a feat he alone can claim!

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#77 - Monte Irvin

Monte Irvin is probably the best athlete to ever come out of New Jersey having lettered in SIXTEEN sports in high school! One problem though…Irvin played baseball in the days before Jackie Robinson broke the MLB color barrier, so a good chunk of his baseball career was spent in the Negro Leagues. Initially, Irvin played under the name “Jimmy Nelson” because he was playing pro ball while STILL IN HIGH SCHOOL (He needed to maintain his amateur status while making a few bucks on the side!).  Roy Campanella said that Irvin “was the best ball player he had ever seen!

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#78 - Mike Piazza

Another catcher makes the list, and this one was an offensive MONSTER!  Piazza was a decent enough catcher, but it was as a hitter where he stood out!  His lifetime batting average was .308 (Only two catchers ever did better), hit 427 home runs (396 were as a catcher and this is a record for the position!), was Rookie of the Year, a 12x All-Star, a 10x Silver Slugger winner and an inductee into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007.

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#79 - Ichiro

This Japanese import is simply known as “Ichiro” (Last name Suzuki) came into the league at 27, and in his rookie year, he was the league MVP AND Rookie of the Year!  He stands as one of the greatest hitters in the league with 10 consecutive seasons with 200 or more hits, was a 3x Silver Slugger, an 10x All Star, a 10x Gold Glove, he won the batting title twice, has almost 3,100 hits, and had a lifetime batting average over .300.

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#80 - Duke Snider

“The Duke of Flatbush” was named to the National League All-Star roster 8x, was the, he helped lead the Dodgers to six World Series, helping them win 2 (1955 and 1959), was a lifetime .300 hitter, swatted over 400 home runs, and most importantly, he was Mamma Dimino’s FAVORITE player!

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#81 - Charlie Gehringer

Time for a blast from the past!  Charlie Gehringer played his whole career at 2B for the Tigers, and in over 10,000 plate appearances he only struck out 372 times in 10,000+ plate appearances!  Couple that with his 6 All Star Awards, an MVP, a league batting title,  led all American League second basemen in fielding percentage and assists seven times, his 7,068 assists is the second highest total in major league history for a second baseman, he collected 5,369 putouts as a second baseman (the 6th highest total for a second baseman) and 1,444 double plays (the 7th highest total for a second baseman).

Cellini may not be crazy about this choice, but DIMINO SAYS IT STANDS !

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#82 - Johnny Mize

A Georgia boy from Demerest, Johnny Mize (The Big Cat) was the first person to hit 51 home runs in a season with only 42 strikeouts, and the most he ever had in a season was 57!  In addition, he bashed 359 home runs, drove in almost 1400 runs, was a 10x All Star, won a batting title, and was part of a Yankees dynasty at the end of his career that won 5 STRAIGHT World Series! 

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#83 - Vladimir Guerrero

Vladimir Guerrero was a BEAST!  He labored in relative obscurity during the beginning of his career in Montreal, but got the spotlight once he started playing out west with the Anaheim Angels in 2004.  When it was all said and done, Vlad’s career numbers are straight up NASTY with 449 home runs, almost 1500 RBI, was a 9x All Star, an 8x Silver Slugger and was inducted into the Hall of Fame.

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#84 - Craig Biggio

Craig Biggio is an interesting ball player.  He played three positions (2nd Base, Outfield, and Catcher) and taken individually, he was never the best at any one position.  However, when factoring in all three, Biggio’s stats are FILTHY!  He had almost 300 home runs, almost 1200 RBI, over 400 stolen bases, was a 5x Silver Slugger, 4x Gold Glove, and was a 7x All Star.

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#85 - Willie McCovey

Willie McCovey was one of the most intimidating power hitters of his era, and was called “the scariest hitter in baseball” by pitcher Bob Gibson, and “Mr. October Reggie” Jackson concurred. McCovey totaled up 521 home runs which included a home run on September 16, 1966 described as the longest ever hit in San Francisco.  Add to it: Rookie of the Year, a Major League Player of the Year Award, an MVP, a 6X All Star winner, and a Hall of Fame induction.

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#86 - Brooks Robinson

When baseball players are measured for their defensive skills, Brooks Robinson is immediately tops the list for third base!  Robinson won 16 Gold Gloves, was an 18x All Star, an ALCS Championship MVP and World Series MVP.  
Add to that list some decent career offensive numbers and the case is made!

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#87 - Goose Gossage

This reliever is MONEY having recorded the final out in 7 post season games!  In addition, the Goose was an All-Star 9x, has over 300 saves, a lifetime ERA of 3.01 and currently has a bust in Cooperstown.

In the all-important category of “Relievers With Killer Moustaches,” Gossage DEFINITELY has Rollie Fingers’ beat, and that was enough to move him into the #87 slot!

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#88 - Carlton Fisk

Another catcher graces Dimino’s Top 100, and Carlton Fisk is one who defined his position!  It started with his winning “Rookie of the Year,” ended with his induction in the Hall of Fame, and in-between Fisk racked up 3 Silver Sluggers, was an 11x All Star, and won a gold glove!

On a side note, he owns a record as a catcher that will probably never be broken: Fisk once caught 25 Straight Innings!

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#89 - Curt Schilling

Dimino REALLY doesn’t like this guy, but if you’re looking for a beast on the mound, Schilling is the man!  He’s a 6x All Star, a World Series MVP, and a NLCS MVP. A sure bet for a Hall of Fame bust, right?

Maybe not! His mouth is probably keeping him out of Cooperstown! Good thing Schilling appears here!

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#90 - Roy Campanella

Campanella got a late start in the majors at 26 years old, but managed to make up for lost time by racking up 3 MVP Awards, over 240 home runs (An amazing feat for a catcher at that time), and was an 8x All Star.  BONUS: He owned a liquor store.  HOW COOL IS THAT?  Ask Cellini!  He’ll tell you!

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#91 Tom Glavine

The First Atlanta Brave makes his appearance on Dimino’s Top 100 Baseball players of all time, and it’s none other than Hall of Fame Starting Pitcher Tom Glavine! Key Stats: 100+ games over .500, won 2 Cy Young Awards, has a .600 lifetime winning percentage, and was a 4x Silver Slugger! Most impressive was his dominace during baseball’s steroid era when both the baseballs AND opposing hitters were JUICED!

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#92 - Tim Raines

He’s never won an MVP, but Tim Raines has insane stats that dictate his place in this list.  He stole over 800 bases, batted a lifetime .294, and got a ton of walks (which ROCK when you can take second)!  Raines is perhaps the most underrated player on this list, but he’s good enough for #92!

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#93 - Dave Winfield

Dimino thinks that if this survey was for the “Top 100 Athletes in Baseball,” Dave Winfield would probably top the list since he was recruited by MLB, the NFL and NBA.  In this list, Winfield shows some amazing career numbers, but it won’t get him any higher than #93.
And honestly, that aint too shabby!

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#94 - Robin Yount

Bonus points should be awarded to Robin Yount in this Top 100 for being forced to wear those god-awful Milwaukee Brewers Uniforms throughout the 80’s! HOWEVER, since this is NOT a survey of Baseball Fashion Mistakes, he remains at #94.  Dimino would have placed him higher, but feels that there’s some players who are currently active who will probably eclipse Yount’s career numbers. 

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#95 - Jeff Bagwell

Cellini isn’t crazy about this choice because Bagwell had a rep for being a dirty player. Dimino doesn’t care!  ONLY stats dictate admission to this list!  Being a jerk on the diamond is IRRELEVANT.

HOWEVER, if being a jerk WAS the judging criteria, Bagwell would probably show up in the Top 20 in the “Baseball’s Top 100 Jackwagons Survey.”

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#96 - Willie Stargell

The Pittsburgh Pirates’ Willie Stargell shows up here on the list at #96.  Sure, he has the baseball chops to appear in Dimino’s Top 100 Players of All Time and yeah, he’s in Baseball Hall of Fame, but what sets him apart from the others on this list? He’s the only player ever to hit a home run into a Tuba!  Though it’s not an “official stat,” it is impressive because the band was supposed to be out of home run ball range.
THAT’S POWER AT THE PLATE!

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#97 - Ozzie Smith

Dimino picks Ozzie Smith as the 97th best Baseball Player of All Time.  If he was in St. Louis, we’re pretty sure the station would be stormed by irate Cardinals fans brandishing torches and pitchforks who believe Smith should rank higher on the list. 

Guess What: We’re here, they’re there, and Dimino’s sticking to his guns!  97TH IT IS!

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There is NO #98!

#98 - DELETED FOR DRUG TEST FAIL!

LET THE CONTROVERSY BEGIN!  

There is NO #98!

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#99 - Bill Dickey

Dickey was a lifetime New York Yankee both as a player, and a coach!  During his stint on the field, he amassed over 200 home ruins, 1200 RBI, a lifetime batting average over .300, and was an 11X All Star.  In his only season as the Yankees Head Coach, Dickey went 57-48.

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#100 Ralph Kiner

Dimino kicks things off with Ralph Kiner, a ball player who statistically stacks up with some of the biggest names in the game, but whose fame was lessened due to his relatively short baseball career.  Why did Kiner’s name not appear higher on this list?  Play the audio above for the answer!

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MULLIGAN #1 - Rollie Fingers

Dimino had problems adding Rollie Fingers to this list.  There’s one statistic that SHOULD keep Fingers out of Dimino’s top 100, but if it didn’t keep Fingers out of the Baseball Hall of Fame, it aint keeping him out of here!

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